Critics concerned assessment tool could consider proxies for race and socioeconomic status

Can Philly’s new technology predict recidivism without being racist?

A tool to help predict whether someone who’s been arrested will reoffend does not factor in race. But it could consider convictions. So you’ve just been arrested. Welcome to Philadelphia’s criminal justice system.

Criminal justice world divided on risk-assessment tools

How computers are predicting crime – and potentially impacting your future

For about eight years, Philadelphia’s probation and parole department has used a computer algorithm to rate the riskiness of nearly every offender it oversees. But officials there won’t say what factors the tool weighs, raising questions about transparency. The city plans to create a similar risk assessment tool for use in bail decisions.

This week: Life-saving bootcamp, event news and expanding our project

This week:

• ALERT! Please share your thoughts before time runs out
• Lancaster’s life-training bootcamp keeps people from returning to prison
• Solve Philly’s recidivism problem at this Reentry Project hackathon
• Lenfest Institute for Journalism announces $2 million in grants to support innovation in local journalism

Read it now: The Reentry Project Weekly: September 22, 2017

Subscribe for free: The Reentry Project Weekly

Lenfest Institute grant will help expand The Reentry Project to become the Philadelphia Solutions Journalism Project

Lenfest Institute press release introduces the Philadelphia Solutions Journalism Project:

“This project is a collaboration of Philadelphia’s general interest, community and multicultural newsrooms to carry out solutions-oriented reporting and community engagement on critical issues facing the city. The project initially covered prisoner re-entry to society and now plans to expand the topics of its coverage. The grant will assist the news collaborative with its organizational capacity and strategic planning as well as its news coverage. Participating organizations include the Temple University Klein College of Media and Communication, The Philadelphia Citizen, The Philadelphia Inquirer, Philadelphia Daily News, philly.com, the Muhlenberg College Department of Media and Communication, Generocity, WHYY, PhillyCAM, The Philadelphia Tribune, El Zol Philly, WURD, El Sol, Billy Penn, The Philadelphia Public School Notebook and Next City.”

Read the full release:

Lenfest Institute for Journalism announces $2 million in grants to support innovation in local journalism, in Philadelphia and elsewhere

Lenfest Institute for Journalism announces $2 million in grants to support innovation in local journalism, in Philadelphia and elsewhere PHILADELPHIA (Sept. 21, 2017) – The Lenfest Institute for Journalism today announced $2 million in grants to support innovation in local journalism, both in its home city of Philadelphia and elsewhere in the country.

Hackathon to focus on reentry and we want you there

Solve Philly’s recidivism problem at this Reentry Project hackathon – Generocity Philly

The Reentry Project is the coalition of 15 newsrooms, including Generocity, dedicated to reporting on reentry in Philadelphia. Why reentry? Because one in six Philadelphians has been incarcerated, and two-third of them will return to prison. That’s unacceptable. Next month, that coalition is hosting the first local hackathon focused on reentry.

Lancaster model reduces recidivism rate to 15 percent

Lancaster’s life-training boot camp keeps people from returning to prison

After nearly two decades in prison, Isaac Rivera was ready to remake himself. The 41-year-old from Lancaster served time after a 1997 arrest on assault and rape charges, but he felt that his violent past was behind him – if only he could find a way to jump-start his reinvention.