This month: A new art collaboration, free expungement clinics, families of incarcerated individuals and more

Parenting from inside prison walls

Barnes Foundation teams with Mural Arts’ re-entry program

Philadelphia Reentry Coalition has finally released cohesive recidivism data

New tool helps juvenile lifers navigate reentry to a dramatically different world

Volunteer lawyers help Philly offenders clear records and move forward

Read it now:
The Reentry Project Monthly: March, 2018

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Expungement clinics being held around city

Volunteer lawyers help Philly offenders clear records and move forward

Nearly one in three Philadelphia residents has a criminal record. Many of these people were never found guilty of a major wrongdoing, but often that doesn’t make a difference. Just having “a record” is enough to make you ineligible for employment, education, housing and public assistance.

More prison admissions, far steeper sentences

Generations of Philadelphia families are incarcerated together

Cintron Sr.’s own father wasn’t around when he was a kid in Puerto Rico. He came to Philadelphia at 15 in search of opportunities, and found gang life. “When I fight the leader,” he said, in English learned in prison, “I become the leader of the gang.”

A Pennsylvania mother struggles to transition after years of incarceration

Redina’s story: A mother’s troubled journey home from prison

Listen 29:15 This story also can be experienced as a radio documentary. To listen, click the play button above or download the podcast of this special Nov. 27, 2017 episode of WHYY’s NewsWorks Tonight on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. The story was reported and produced by Katie Colaneri, edited by Sandra Clark and Eugene Sonn.

City much more likely to send probationers back to prison

The problem with probation in Philadelphia: ‘This thing is bigger than Meek Mill’

The news of Meek Mill, imprisoned since last week for violating his probation, is nearly impossible to miss in Philadelphia. A billboard on the Schuylkill illuminates his plight, and a bus has been circling City Hall the last couple days to bring further attention.

Act of good citizenship sparks fast friendship

A lawyer’s lost bags lead to a juvenile lifer’s redemption

The briefcases lay on the South Philadelphia street, abandoned, one neatly leaning against the other like a couple of downed dominoes. At first, Jeffrey Branch, 53, thought someone got robbed. Nope, he told himself. Not touching those. He took another look.