City much more likely to send probationers back to prison

The problem with probation in Philadelphia: ‘This thing is bigger than Meek Mill’

The news of Meek Mill, imprisoned since last week for violating his probation, is nearly impossible to miss in Philadelphia. A billboard on the Schuylkill illuminates his plight, and a bus has been circling City Hall the last couple days to bring further attention.

Act of good citizenship sparks fast friendship

A lawyer’s lost bags lead to a juvenile lifer’s redemption

The briefcases lay on the South Philadelphia street, abandoned, one neatly leaning against the other like a couple of downed dominoes. At first, Jeffrey Branch, 53, thought someone got robbed. Nope, he told himself. Not touching those. He took another look.

Family hopes new district attorney will take up case for review

A prosecutor meets the juvenile lifer he locked up for 40 years – and apologizes

“You never drove a car. You never fell in love with somebody. You never had any of the things that all of us take for granted. And I want you to know I am responsible for that – because I told the jury what they should do, and they did it.”

Business leaders surveyed on hiring formerly incarcerated people

What Philly-area CEOs think about hiring ex-inmates

Some firms believe in – and are willing to – give the formerly incarcerated a second chance. At other firms, restrictions mandated by clients or other associations forbid the practice. – Jane M. Von Bergen, Philadelphia Inquirer and Daily News

Jenkins heading for Harrisburg; releases video calling for end to cash bail

Week 7: Malcolm Jenkins Criminal Justice Season – The Philadelphia Citizen

Next week, I’ll be visiting our State Capitol along with other NFL players to talk to lawmakers and policymakers about the state of criminal justice reform, with a special emphasis on lobbying for the Clean Slate Act, which I’ve written about here before. Twice before, I’ve joined my fellow football players on trips to Washington, D.C.

Juvenile lifer released, finds himself surrounded by unfamiliar devices

Locked up 40 years for a murder his brother confessed to, Kevin Brinkley returns home, to a changed world

When Kevin Brinkley was locked up four decades ago at the age of 15, he had never heard of such a thing as a mobile phone. On Thursday morning, as he stepped blinking into the daylight outside of the State Correctional Institution-Forest, he was surrounded by the unfamiliar devices.