One: A brownie makes the difference in the neighborhood

Ten things you should know about open hiring

Ten more things you should know about Greyston Bakery and its open hiring process: (Just to review, the Yonkers supplier of brownies to Ben & Jerry’s and Whole Foods skips background checks, skill tests, resumes and references. Applicants put their names on a list and are called when there are openings.

This post is related to yesterday’s report: No skills tests, no background checks, just a life-saving job at a bakery


This piece was produced by The Philadelphia Inquirer, Philadelphia Daily News, Philly.com and WHYY/NewsWorks for The Reentry Project, a citywide collaborative news initiative. It is part of an occasional series — across the city and across platforms — on the challenges facing people returning from prison and what can be done about them.

The Philadelphia InquirerPhilly Daily NewsPhilly Dotcom

Open hiring means getting a job despite having criminal record


No skills tests, no background checks, just a life-saving job at a bakery

When former drug dealer Dion Drew got out of prison, no one would hire him. Then he learned about a bakery that didn’t do background checks, didn’t test skills, didn’t require references. As much as Greyston’s “open hiring” practice helped Drew, it’s also making a difference to the bottom line, says CEO Mike Brady.


This piece was produced by The Philadelphia Inquirer, Philadelphia Daily News, Philly.com and WHYY/NewsWorks for The Reentry Project, a citywide collaborative news initiative. It is part of an occasional series — across the city and across platforms — on the challenges facing people returning from prison and what can be done about them.

The Philadelphia InquirerPhilly Daily NewsPhilly Dotcom

 

Lawmakers introduce Fair Chance Act

Booker, Republicans introduce federal ban-the-box legislation

A little more than a year after Philadelphia expanded its ban-the-box law, which prevents employers from asking about criminal backgrounds until a job offer has been made, federal legislators introduced similar national legislation in Washington. – Jane M. Von Bergen, Philadelphia Inquirer and Daily News

Coffee brand helps citizens to rebuild after prison

For ex-cons seeking a straight life, a new coffee company offers a career path

WHYY is one of 15 news organizations in the Philadelphia Reentry Reporting Collaborative, a solutions-oriented focus on the issues facing formerly incarcerated Philadelphians. The aim is to produce journalism that speaks, across the city and across media platforms, to the challenges and solutions for reentry.