Coalition sends workers to factory with industry-recognized certificates earned in jail

What works: In rural Tennessee, ex-offenders get a second chance and a new career

WINCHESTER, TENNESSEE – Scott Crago says everyone deserves a second chance. That goes for ex-criminals fresh out of jail. Crago has heard all the tales of heartbreak in rural Tennessee – absent daddies, grannies raising babies, mamas dying young, drinking, drugs and what that all means for folks locked up in the Franklin County jail.

Act of good citizenship sparks fast friendship

A lawyer’s lost bags lead to a juvenile lifer’s redemption

The briefcases lay on the South Philadelphia street, abandoned, one neatly leaning against the other like a couple of downed dominoes. At first, Jeffrey Branch, 53, thought someone got robbed. Nope, he told himself. Not touching those. He took another look.

POWER Northeast fights to increase voter registration in the Lehigh Valley

In a City Where 15 Percent of Voters Elected the Mayor, Downtown Is Claiming Power

In 1984, Sydney ‘Trek’ Mckenzie’s middle school class assembled to listen to Geraldine Ferraro, a vice presidential candidate, speak to a crowd in Allentown, Pennsylvania. This simple class trip, organized by Mckenzie’s teacher, was a moment that changed his life. It was the moment that he realized the power in politics.

Employers discuss hiring previously incarcerated people

Advice for firms to hire former inmates: Let a partner help

Bruce Murray hires for a 10-person window rehab business. Bonnie Eckstein is talent acquisition manager for Ikea, which runs 47 U.S. stores. Both want to know more about how to hire people coming from prison. – Jane M. Von Bergen, Philadelphia Inquirer and Daily News

This week: Business leaders discuss the benefits of hiring formerly incarcerated people. And a prosecutor apologizes to a juvenile lifer

This week:

• A prosecutor meets the juvenile lifer he locked up for 40 years – and apologizes
• What Philly-area CEOs think about hiring ex-inmates
• Photos: Business leaders discuss benefits of hiring formerly incarcerated people
• Small biz owners: Check out this how-to on hiring returning citizens

Read it now: The Reentry Project Weekly: November 3, 2017

Subscribe for free: The Reentry Project Weekly

Photos: Business leaders discuss benefits of hiring formerly incarcerated people


This morning in Philadelphia, The Reentry Project hosted “Reentry: Hiring from an untapped pool,” a panel discussion about hiring formerly incarcerated people.


Panelists seated from left included Donna Allie, PhD, president and CEO of Team Clean, Jeff Brown, chief executive of Brown’s Super Stores Inc., Bob Logue, president of Quaker City Coffee and Beth Tiewater, director of development and programs of Baker Industries.


As representatives of local companies who frequently hire from the reentry pool, they spoke about why they do it, what the challenges are, and why they think other businesses could benefit.


The Philadelphia Media Network organized this gathering, which took place at the Chamber of Commerce for Greater Philadelphia.