This month: Best practices for businesses, incarcerated families, Malcom Jenkins’ 2018 wishlist and more

Generations of Philadelphia families are incarcerated together

4 smart practices for hiring formerly incarcerated Philadelphians

MALCOLM JENKINS’ CRIMINAL JUSTICE SEASON: Playoff Edition

Do you have a returning citizen-friendly workplace?

• Watch it one more time: The Reentry Blueprint

Read it now:
The Reentry Project Monthly: February, 2018

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Employers can welcome returning citizens with new icon on Generocity job board

Do you have a returning citizen-friendly workplace? – Generocity Philly

One of the trickiest parts of rejoining the outside world after spending time in the criminal justice system is finding work. As the Generocity jobs board has grown, we’ve increasingly recognized the bit role that we can play in contributing to a solution.

Philadelphia businesses share best practices for supporting formerly incarcerated employees

4 smart practices for hiring formerly incarcerated Philadelphians – Generocity Philly

And according to a recent American Civil Liberties Union report, 75 percent of formerly incarcerated people struggle with employment a year after release. In a city with an estimated population of 1.5 million, that means at least 187,500 Philadelphians in this group could be struggling with employment.

Tapping shunned labor pool produces excellent results

Lessons learned: Hiring ex-offenders pays off, but the workers need help

Sitting at her kitchen table in Chester, in her moments of deepest despair, Dayna Chandler, 33, began this calculation: Maybe her three children would be better off if she were dead. A former bank teller, she had a criminal conviction for theft, had been in prison and hadn’t been able to keep a job for four years, not with that record, even though it was only a misdemeanor.

Coalition sends workers to factory with industry-recognized certificates earned in jail

What works: In rural Tennessee, ex-offenders get a second chance and a new career

WINCHESTER, TENNESSEE – Scott Crago says everyone deserves a second chance. That goes for ex-criminals fresh out of jail. Crago has heard all the tales of heartbreak in rural Tennessee – absent daddies, grannies raising babies, mamas dying young, drinking, drugs and what that all means for folks locked up in the Franklin County jail.

Act of good citizenship sparks fast friendship

A lawyer’s lost bags lead to a juvenile lifer’s redemption

The briefcases lay on the South Philadelphia street, abandoned, one neatly leaning against the other like a couple of downed dominoes. At first, Jeffrey Branch, 53, thought someone got robbed. Nope, he told himself. Not touching those. He took another look.