Activists launch efforts to raise community money for bail

Can a Philly community bail fund fix our criminal-justice system?

The Philly Community Bail Fund is an effort that’s part protest against a cash-bail system they say unfairly penalizes the poor, and part stopgap until a more permanent change can be made. – Samantha Melamed, Philadelphia Inquirer and Daily News

This week: Business leaders discuss the benefits of hiring formerly incarcerated people. And a prosecutor apologizes to a juvenile lifer

This week:

• A prosecutor meets the juvenile lifer he locked up for 40 years – and apologizes
• What Philly-area CEOs think about hiring ex-inmates
• Photos: Business leaders discuss benefits of hiring formerly incarcerated people
• Small biz owners: Check out this how-to on hiring returning citizens

Read it now: The Reentry Project Weekly: November 3, 2017

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Family hopes new district attorney will take up case for review

A prosecutor meets the juvenile lifer he locked up for 40 years – and apologizes

“You never drove a car. You never fell in love with somebody. You never had any of the things that all of us take for granted. And I want you to know I am responsible for that – because I told the jury what they should do, and they did it.”

Dealing often felt more promising than school

Lost in the education system, two West Philly natives on what got them into – and out of – jail

John Glenn and Aaron Kirkland say drug dealing often felt more promising than school Josh Glenn was first introduced to the world of drug dealing when he was 13. When he was working as a bagger at local grocery stores, someone from his West Philadelphia community approached him, asking if he would be interested in making “real money.”

After almost 40 years, man serving life sentence could get parole

Man serving life, for murder his brother confessed to, gets chance at freedom

For nearly 40 years, the Brinkley family has insisted that the wrong brother was sentenced to life in prison for murder – that it was 14-year-old Ronald who fatally shot egg-delivery man Charles Haag on Dec. 22, 1977, though 15-year-old Kevin was convicted.