Tapping shunned labor pool produces excellent results

Lessons learned: Hiring ex-offenders pays off, but the workers need help

Sitting at her kitchen table in Chester, in her moments of deepest despair, Dayna Chandler, 33, began this calculation: Maybe her three children would be better off if she were dead. A former bank teller, she had a criminal conviction for theft, had been in prison and hadn’t been able to keep a job for four years, not with that record, even though it was only a misdemeanor.

Animal control officer honored for work he started while in prison

This Germantown native helps Philly dogs get adopted and takes strays off the streets

Animal control officer Steven Morales’ schedule changes constantly. From replying to complaints to responding to calls about stranded animals, he doesn’t have a typical day at Philly’s Animal Care & Control Team. Though it can get hectic at times, the work he does can be rewarding and something he wants to continue to do.

Coalition sends workers to factory with industry-recognized certificates earned in jail

What works: In rural Tennessee, ex-offenders get a second chance and a new career

WINCHESTER, TENNESSEE – Scott Crago says everyone deserves a second chance. That goes for ex-criminals fresh out of jail. Crago has heard all the tales of heartbreak in rural Tennessee – absent daddies, grannies raising babies, mamas dying young, drinking, drugs and what that all means for folks locked up in the Franklin County jail.

POWER Northeast fights to increase voter registration in the Lehigh Valley

In a City Where 15 Percent of Voters Elected the Mayor, Downtown Is Claiming Power

In 1984, Sydney ‘Trek’ Mckenzie’s middle school class assembled to listen to Geraldine Ferraro, a vice presidential candidate, speak to a crowd in Allentown, Pennsylvania. This simple class trip, organized by Mckenzie’s teacher, was a moment that changed his life. It was the moment that he realized the power in politics.

Employers discuss hiring previously incarcerated people

Advice for firms to hire former inmates: Let a partner help

Bruce Murray hires for a 10-person window rehab business. Bonnie Eckstein is talent acquisition manager for Ikea, which runs 47 U.S. stores. Both want to know more about how to hire people coming from prison. – Jane M. Von Bergen, Philadelphia Inquirer and Daily News

Photos: Business leaders discuss benefits of hiring formerly incarcerated people


This morning in Philadelphia, The Reentry Project hosted “Reentry: Hiring from an untapped pool,” a panel discussion about hiring formerly incarcerated people.


Panelists seated from left included Donna Allie, PhD, president and CEO of Team Clean, Jeff Brown, chief executive of Brown’s Super Stores Inc., Bob Logue, president of Quaker City Coffee and Beth Tiewater, director of development and programs of Baker Industries.


As representatives of local companies who frequently hire from the reentry pool, they spoke about why they do it, what the challenges are, and why they think other businesses could benefit.


The Philadelphia Media Network organized this gathering, which took place at the Chamber of Commerce for Greater Philadelphia.