State legislators considering better guidelines for public school discipline

Pa. guidelines for school discipline may change

After learning about a 6-year-old autistic student who was put in handcuffs for biting his aide in 2013, Phoenixville parent Blake Emmanuel took action. Before she was through, a bipartisan legislative commission had investigated harsh disciplinary practices in schools and concluded that they negatively affect all students, but that children of color and those with disabilities are disproportionately affected.

Join us at a free event Tuesday: Re-Entry Film Festival will feature “They Call Us Monsters” documentary

You can RSVP for this free event now:

Re-Entry Film Festival Featuring: “They Call Us Monsters”

A Re-Entry Film Festival and Panel discussion featuring the documentary: “They Call Us Monsters”. This film explores the dynamics of the criminal justice system in which juveniles are treated like adults and held in adult prisons, sometimes for life.

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More info: A Re-Entry Film Festival and panel discussion featuring the documentary: “They Call Us Monsters”. This film explores the dynamics of the criminal justice system in which juveniles are treated like adults and held in adult prisons, sometimes for life. The panel discussion will feature expert criminologists, community activists and formerly incarcerated juvenile lifers who will share their experiences, insights and solutions for addressing this horrible practice. The Reentry Project’s Editor, Jean Friedman-Rudovsky, will also participate in the panel.

DATE AND TIME: Tue, June 20, 2017, 6:00 PM – 11:00 PM EDT

LOCATION: The Rotunda, 4014 Walnut St., Philadelphia, PA 19104

RSVP now via Eventbrite

Event organizers: Frontline Dads, Inc. / Black Male Engagement (BMe) / TCRC

This week: Read, listen and get back with us

This week:

Women in reentry, oldest teen lifer, new statewide efforts, getting out the vote, telling us your story — and more.

Read it now: The Reentry Project Weekly: May 21, 2017

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Thank you, The Reentry Project

Philadelphia’s oldest teen lifer won’t seek parole

Philly’s oldest juvenile lifer resentenced, but is it too late?

“I was arrested in Philadelphia at the age of 15. I was in jail quite a few years,” said Joe Ligon, who recently turned 80 in prison. He’s eligible for parole – but will he apply after decades in an institution?

Juvenile lifers must choose between seeking new sentences and pursuing exoneration

A judge called this juvenile lifer innocent, but he’s still in prison. Will Philly’s next DA let him go home?

Terrance Lewis, sentenced to life for second-degree murder, read the opinion in his prison cell. “The great part was, somebody finally believed me,” he said. “The sad part was, I still got to die in jail.” – Samantha Melamed, Philadelphia Inquirer