‘Beyond the Walls’ summit focuses on healthcare during and after incarceration

Healthy inmates can help create a healthier community

After serving their time, today’s inmates will return to their homes and community. In essence, prison health becomes public health, said Hannah Zellman, program director with Philadelphia FIGHT, the nonprofit that hosted Wednesday’s “Beyond the Walls: Prison Healthcare and Reentry Summit.” The annual summit began as a tiny conference focused on the intersection of HIV/AIDS and incarceration.

Pa. offers new plan for ‘swift and certain’ justice

Pennsylvania offers a new ‘smart on crime’ approach. But does it actually work?

Parents should be consistent, punishing kids immediately, predictably and fairly when they misbehave. The same logic, some believe, should guide our criminal justice system. The problem with the way probation and parole violations are addressed – according to Bret Bucklen, director of research at the Pennsylvania Department of Corrections – is that authorities act like lousy parents.

State halfway houses undergoing attempts at reform

Fixing an Urban Housing Crisis That Most People Can’t See

Debi Smith is on a mission. It began four years ago, in March 2013, when she dropped her son off at a halfway house in North Philadelphia following his release from state prison. It was supposed to be a short stay. Maurice “Reese” Ingersoll had struggled for years with mental illness and substance abuse issues.

Juvenile lifers must choose between seeking new sentences and pursuing exoneration

A judge called this juvenile lifer innocent, but he’s still in prison. Will Philly’s next DA let him go home?

Terrance Lewis, sentenced to life for second-degree murder, read the opinion in his prison cell. “The great part was, somebody finally believed me,” he said. “The sad part was, I still got to die in jail.” – Samantha Melamed, Philadelphia Inquirer

Following U.S. Supreme Court decision, and 40 years in prison, man finally paroled

After 40 years claiming innocence, Philly juvenile lifer is free

Tyrone Jones rode the elevator up to the 28th floor of One Liberty Place, a building that didn’t exist the last time he was a free man, and looked out over a city transformed. “Before I went to prison, Market Street wasn’t this crowded. The sports complex, that wasn’t there,” he said Thursday.