These women take to the airwaves on a radio show for those experiencing life after prison

After serving time, women serve public good with radio show about re-entry

From a small room in Center City, radio activist Vanessa Graber wants to broadcast the realities of post-prison life to thousands of Philadelphians. Next week, PhillyCam, the public-access media nonprofit, will launch WPPM 106.5. It’s one of three new radio stations created following a grassroots push to carve out more slots on FM dials across the country.

Even after Pope Francis visit, life remains hard for those in Philadelphia’s prison system

A year later, inmates who met Pope Francis are still caught in the justice system – Generocity Philly

(Photo by Max Marin) Correction: Angelo Cameron is Brandan Hargrose’s court-appointed lawyer, not a public defender. Edit 9/28 @ 12:40 p.m. In the summer of 2015, Brandan Hargrose was working in the upholstery shop at Curran-Fromhold Correctional Facility, happy to be using his hands again, to have a job again, a hardscrabble routine for his life behind bars.

From prison to vice-president, Rob Rosa owes it all to his dogs

A year later, inmates who met Pope Francis are still caught in the justice system – Generocity Philly

(Photo by Max Marin) Correction: Angelo Cameron is Brandan Hargrose’s court-appointed lawyer, not a public defender. Edit 9/28 @ 12:40 p.m. In the summer of 2015, Brandan Hargrose was working in the upholstery shop at Curran-Fromhold Correctional Facility, happy to be using his hands again, to have a job again, a hardscrabble routine for his life behind bars.

From Graterford to grants, El Sawyer has used his past to affect others’ future

Bobbing and Weaving Through A Minefield

When El Sawyer was 17 years old, he was sentenced to 8 years in Graterford prison for a drug-related shooting. At night, he lay awake in his cell, in fear of a rotating string of cellmates in the bunk above him, thinking about what went on in the prison-the stabbings, killings, suicide, depression, and anger.

Gravity can’t hold local filmmakers or released offenders down

How these local filmmakers are exposing the root of recidivism – Generocity Philly

(Screenshot) If we want to reconcile the socioeconomic consequences of mass incarceration, we can’t ignore the cyclical nature of the environments we’re sending formerly incarcerated individuals back into. Those environments – produced by generations of marginalization – harness a nearly inescapable gravitational pull that victimize the people who live within them.