This week: Here’s what’s actually happening

This week:

• Malcolm Jenkins’ September Surprise
• Pennsylvania let 70 teen killers out of prison in the last year. Here’s what happened.
• Meet the Disruptor: Quaker City Coffee

Read it now: The Reentry Project Weekly: September 8, 2017

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Released lifers feeling extraordinary privilege and grave responsibility

Pennsylvania let 70 teen killers out of prison in the last year. Here’s what happened.

These are the first of 517 juvenile lifers in Pennsylvania, the largest such contingent in the nation, to be resentenced and released on parole following a Supreme Court decision that mandatory life-without-parole sentences for minors are unconstitutional. – Samantha Melamed, Philadelphia Inquirer and Daily News

Malcolm Jenkins wants you to really stare in the mirror and think

Malcolm Jenkins’ September Surprise – The Philadelphia Citizen

Last Friday night, local fashionistas, football aficionados and social justice warriors converged on the Center City restaurant Maison 208 for a party thrown by Jay Amin and Eagle All-Pro safety and activist Malcolm Jenkins, the co-owners of Washington Square’s Damari Savile, the bespoke men’s fashion store.

Partners pair up coffee with jobs

Meet the Disruptor: Quaker City Coffee – The Philadelphia Citizen

In some ways, Quaker City Coffee partners Bob Logue and Christian Dennis have lived parallel lives. Both men grew up in Frankford, developed keen eyes for supply and demand, and became entrepreneurs. For Logue, that meant becoming a partner in Federal Donuts and Bodhi Coffee, catering to the city’s foodie culture.

Dealing often felt more promising than school

Lost in the education system, two West Philly natives on what got them into – and out of – jail

John Glenn and Aaron Kirkland say drug dealing often felt more promising than school Josh Glenn was first introduced to the world of drug dealing when he was 13. When he was working as a bagger at local grocery stores, someone from his West Philadelphia community approached him, asking if he would be interested in making “real money.”