Seventeen percent of Philadelphia inmates living with serious mental illness

Can Pennsylvania find a way out for thousands of mentally ill inmates languishing in county jails?

Bruce Herdman, chief of medical operations for the Philadelphia Department of Prisons, sometimes describes the county jails this way: “This is the largest psychiatric hospital in the state of Pennsylvania.” Forty percent of Philadelphia inmates are on psychotropic medications; 17 percent have what’s considered a serious mental illness, such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or major depression.

Panelists pointed to lack of jobs and stable, long-term housing

Advocates ask for more reentry efforts in Phila.

Of the 2,000 juveniles serving life sentences around the United States, 500 come from Pennsylvania and 300 come directly from here. That means the city has produced 15 percent of the country’s so-called “juvenile-lifers.” The Youth Sentencing and Reentry Project (YSRP) is working to change that.

Lawyers propose “bold policy reform” to help young people through reentry

It’s National Reentry Week. Here are 4 policy solutions to help youth with criminal records – Generocity Philly

When young people are arrested and charged in the adult criminal system, the impact can be lifelong and the barriers to moving forward can seem insurmountable. Many of those barriers are imposed by the government itself, and can keep necessities like housing and employment out of reach.

Reentry program started by two federal judges gets results

Where Some of the Most Housing-Challenged Philadelphians Find Help

About a year ago, Darryl Booker got a voucher. Booker is 57 and has a chronic heart condition that takes him in and out of the hospital and makes physical activity, including walking up stairs, nearly impossible. When he was released in 2015, “I didn’t have no one,” he says.

Critics: Maybe it’s time to reconsider housing kids in adult jails altogether

Why can’t Philly stop holding kids in solitary confinement?

The situation with her son is pushing Cassandra Barnett to despair. Last week, she quit her job; she was no longer able to make it through the workday without breaking down. The reason: She’d been told her son was in segregation at the Philadelphia Industrial Correctional Center (PICC) — the adult jail that contains a separate cell block for teens charged as adults and awaiting trial.