Philadelphia’s oldest teen lifer won’t seek parole

Philly’s oldest juvenile lifer resentenced, but is it too late?

“I was arrested in Philadelphia at the age of 15. I was in jail quite a few years,” said Joe Ligon, who recently turned 80 in prison. He’s eligible for parole – but will he apply after decades in an institution?

Crowdfunding effort aims to bring women home, inform public on effects of cash bail

Why Philly groups are celebrating Mother’s Day by bailing out black moms

When Romeeka Williams was charged with driving under the influence about a year and a half ago, the steep bail — $50,000 – was far beyond her means. So, the North Philadelphia mother of two spent three weeks in jail, and her children, ages 1 and 3 at the time, were left with her grandmother.

Critics: Maybe it’s time to reconsider housing kids in adult jails altogether

Why can’t Philly stop holding kids in solitary confinement?

The situation with her son is pushing Cassandra Barnett to despair. Last week, she quit her job; she was no longer able to make it through the workday without breaking down. The reason: She’d been told her son was in segregation at the Philadelphia Industrial Correctional Center (PICC) — the adult jail that contains a separate cell block for teens charged as adults and awaiting trial.

Even after Pope Francis visit, life remains hard for those in Philadelphia’s prison system

A year later, inmates who met Pope Francis are still caught in the justice system – Generocity Philly

(Photo by Max Marin) Correction: Angelo Cameron is Brandan Hargrose’s court-appointed lawyer, not a public defender. Edit 9/28 @ 12:40 p.m. In the summer of 2015, Brandan Hargrose was working in the upholstery shop at Curran-Fromhold Correctional Facility, happy to be using his hands again, to have a job again, a hardscrabble routine for his life behind bars.

Some suggest recidivism algorithm needs to be racist to be accurate

That recidivism technology Philadelphia is getting might not account for racist policing – Generocity Philly

The possibility of using big data to alleviate Philadelphia’s overcrowded jails

Can a computer algorithm be trusted to help relieve Philly’s overcrowded jails?

Of the roughly 7 400 people sitting in Philadelphia s jails right now more than half of them aren t there because they ve been found guilty of a crime They ve been accused of one and are waiting for