Tapping shunned labor pool produces excellent results

Lessons learned: Hiring ex-offenders pays off, but the workers need help

Sitting at her kitchen table in Chester, in her moments of deepest despair, Dayna Chandler, 33, began this calculation: Maybe her three children would be better off if she were dead. A former bank teller, she had a criminal conviction for theft, had been in prison and hadn’t been able to keep a job for four years, not with that record, even though it was only a misdemeanor.

This entrepreneur wants to help other returning people put their skills to work

Quaker City Coffee is betting that former drug dealers will make good entrepreneurs – Generocity Philly

“Around the Corner” is a PhillyCAM show that offers local social impact leaders the opportunity to share what impact their work is having on the Philadelphia area. There’s been a push recently in Philadelphia to make it easier for formerly incarcerated folks to find employment. See: Clean Slate legislation and “ban the box” efforts.


Generocity editor Julie Zeglen interviews Christian Dennis. Watch now:

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newsletterIn this week’s edition:

Hope behind bars. How ban-the-box rules help ex-offenders, hurt women, & young people. Employment status is key predictor of recidivism. Ex-drug dealers turn their lives around at ShopRite, but what about the misery they caused on the street?

View it here: Great weekend reading and viewing

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Scholar: Legislation helpful but has unintended consequences

How ban-the-box rules help ex-offenders, hurt women, young people

When it comes to ban-the-box legislation, there are winners and losers. Winners are people with criminal records who now have a better chance of getting work because employers can’t ask prospective employees to check the job application box that asks about arrests and convictions. Philadelphia’s law was passed in 2011 and was strengthened in March 2016.