Lancaster model reduces recidivism rate to 15 percent

Lancaster’s life-training boot camp keeps people from returning to prison

After nearly two decades in prison, Isaac Rivera was ready to remake himself. The 41-year-old from Lancaster served time after a 1997 arrest on assault and rape charges, but he felt that his violent past was behind him – if only he could find a way to jump-start his reinvention.

Intensive program reducing recidivism and stirring statewide conversation

Lancaster knows how to keep people out of jail, but it’s expensive

After nearly two decades in prison, Isaac Rivera was ready to remake himself. The 41-year-old from Lancaster served time after a 1997 arrest on assault and rape charges, but he felt that his violent past was behind him – if only he could find a way to jump-start his reinvention.

Consensus brewing to end cash bail in Philadelphia

How Philly plans to ditch cash bail and what stands in the way

Democratic candidate for district attorney Larry Krasner has a plan to get rid of cash bail. He’s not the only game in town. Josh Glenn was just 16 when he was arrested for aggravated assault with a deadly weapon, charged as an adult and thrown in a Philadelphia jail cell.

Malcolm Jenkins wants you to really stare in the mirror and think

Malcolm Jenkins’ September Surprise – The Philadelphia Citizen

Last Friday night, local fashionistas, football aficionados and social justice warriors converged on the Center City restaurant Maison 208 for a party thrown by Jay Amin and Eagle All-Pro safety and activist Malcolm Jenkins, the co-owners of Washington Square’s Damari Savile, the bespoke men’s fashion store.

Partners pair up coffee with jobs

Meet the Disruptor: Quaker City Coffee – The Philadelphia Citizen

In some ways, Quaker City Coffee partners Bob Logue and Christian Dennis have lived parallel lives. Both men grew up in Frankford, developed keen eyes for supply and demand, and became entrepreneurs. For Logue, that meant becoming a partner in Federal Donuts and Bodhi Coffee, catering to the city’s foodie culture.

Dealing often felt more promising than school

Lost in the education system, two West Philly natives on what got them into – and out of – jail

John Glenn and Aaron Kirkland say drug dealing often felt more promising than school Josh Glenn was first introduced to the world of drug dealing when he was 13. When he was working as a bagger at local grocery stores, someone from his West Philadelphia community approached him, asking if he would be interested in making “real money.”