Dealing often felt more promising than school

Lost in the education system, two West Philly natives on what got them into – and out of – jail

John Glenn and Aaron Kirkland say drug dealing often felt more promising than school Josh Glenn was first introduced to the world of drug dealing when he was 13. When he was working as a bagger at local grocery stores, someone from his West Philadelphia community approached him, asking if he would be interested in making “real money.”

But what about those facing barriers to education?

Colleges shouldn’t ask about applicants’ criminal histories, but most in Philly do – Generocity Philly

Ban the box and Clean Slate initiatives have gained statewide traction in recent months as means to eliminate barriers to employment for formerly incarcerated folks. But what about those folks facing barriers to education?

‘What do you need to thrive back in your community?’

After prison, Faith Bartley wants to help other women get a second chance

Still struggling herself to find housing, Bartley wants to ask other women returning from prison, ‘What do you need to thrive back in your community?’ Faith Bartley wants a home to call her own. Not just a rented room, but somewhere that can take her away from the community that she’s known all her life.

With music and discussion, event focuses on scourge of mass incarceration

Van Jones’ We Rise tour visits Philadelphia

Political commentator and activist Van Jones’ We Rise Tour made a stop at The Fillmore Thursday night to lift the spirits of the City of Brotherly Love and to talk about the problem of mass incarceration. Through a partnership with RocNation, an entertainment company started by rapper JAY-Z, Jones on July 6 began a 14-city tour starting in Los Angeles.

You can still catch “Rethinking Reentry Through Art” at Philadelphia City Hall

In City Hall art display, former inmates offer inside look at what’s needed on the outside…

Artwork by recently released prisoners is now on display inside Philadelphia City Hall. The hallways on its second and fourth floors are lined with paintings and sculptures by people who had been in prison – from amateurs wielding felt pens to trained artists with a studio practice.