One: A brownie makes the difference in the neighborhood

Ten things you should know about open hiring

Ten more things you should know about Greyston Bakery and its open hiring process: (Just to review, the Yonkers supplier of brownies to Ben & Jerry’s and Whole Foods skips background checks, skill tests, resumes and references. Applicants put their names on a list and are called when there are openings.

This post is related to yesterday’s report: No skills tests, no background checks, just a life-saving job at a bakery


This piece was produced by The Philadelphia Inquirer, Philadelphia Daily News, Philly.com and WHYY/NewsWorks for The Reentry Project, a citywide collaborative news initiative. It is part of an occasional series — across the city and across platforms — on the challenges facing people returning from prison and what can be done about them.

The Philadelphia InquirerPhilly Daily NewsPhilly Dotcom

Open hiring means getting a job despite having criminal record


No skills tests, no background checks, just a life-saving job at a bakery

When former drug dealer Dion Drew got out of prison, no one would hire him. Then he learned about a bakery that didn’t do background checks, didn’t test skills, didn’t require references. As much as Greyston’s “open hiring” practice helped Drew, it’s also making a difference to the bottom line, says CEO Mike Brady.


This piece was produced by The Philadelphia Inquirer, Philadelphia Daily News, Philly.com and WHYY/NewsWorks for The Reentry Project, a citywide collaborative news initiative. It is part of an occasional series — across the city and across platforms — on the challenges facing people returning from prison and what can be done about them.

The Philadelphia InquirerPhilly Daily NewsPhilly Dotcom

 

Philadelphia prison populations are declining; reformers say more to come

Has a bold reform plan helped to shrink Philly’s prison population?

Back in January, Municipal Court Judge Marsha Neifield was undertaking a radical experiment in criminal-justice reform from the otherwise drab confines of an 11th-floor courtroom in the Criminal Justice Center. There were no major criminal cases on her docket – just addicts, small-time drug dealers, and a man accused of stealing a power drill from inside a car.

Philadelphia mayor: Reform plan making real progress

City of Philadelphia > ICYMI: Philadelphia Prison Population Down 12 % from Last Year

Transitioning to life after incarceration in Philadelphia

The struggle with life in Philly, after serving time in prison

Leroy “Beyah” Edney was 11 the first time he got locked up. Edney was at a Philadelphia rec center when an argument with another kid turned violent. It didn’t turn out so well for the other kid. Edney spent six months at a juvenile detention center as a result.