This week: Business leaders discuss the benefits of hiring formerly incarcerated people. And a prosecutor apologizes to a juvenile lifer

This week:

• A prosecutor meets the juvenile lifer he locked up for 40 years – and apologizes
• What Philly-area CEOs think about hiring ex-inmates
• Photos: Business leaders discuss benefits of hiring formerly incarcerated people
• Small biz owners: Check out this how-to on hiring returning citizens

Read it now: The Reentry Project Weekly: November 3, 2017

Subscribe for free: The Reentry Project Weekly

Photos: Business leaders discuss benefits of hiring formerly incarcerated people


This morning in Philadelphia, The Reentry Project hosted “Reentry: Hiring from an untapped pool,” a panel discussion about hiring formerly incarcerated people.


Panelists seated from left included Donna Allie, PhD, president and CEO of Team Clean, Jeff Brown, chief executive of Brown’s Super Stores Inc., Bob Logue, president of Quaker City Coffee and Beth Tiewater, director of development and programs of Baker Industries.


As representatives of local companies who frequently hire from the reentry pool, they spoke about why they do it, what the challenges are, and why they think other businesses could benefit.


The Philadelphia Media Network organized this gathering, which took place at the Chamber of Commerce for Greater Philadelphia.

Business leaders surveyed on hiring formerly incarcerated people

What Philly-area CEOs think about hiring ex-inmates

Some firms believe in – and are willing to – give the formerly incarcerated a second chance. At other firms, restrictions mandated by clients or other associations forbid the practice. – Jane M. Von Bergen, Philadelphia Inquirer and Daily News

Sold out event: Discussing challenges and benefits of hiring previously incarcerated people

Small biz owners: Check out this how-to on hiring returning citizens – Generocity Philly

Even if you agree hiring folks with criminal records is a good idea in theory, it can be hard to understand the real-world challenges and benefits. Join The Reentry Project to hear from business leaders who have done it this Thursday.

This Week: Getting ready for #PowerUpReentry – and a new event announcement

This week:

• The Citizen Recommends: PowerUp Reentry
• Code for Philadelphia Hosts Hackathon Aimed at Reducing Recidivism
• Reentry: Hiring from an untapped pool

Read it now: The Reentry Project Weekly: October 20, 2017

Subscribe for free: The Reentry Project Weekly

We’ve got three big events coming up — beginning this week — and they are all free

October 20-21: PowerUp Reentry

PowerUp Reentry: A Digital Solutions Day

What’s this all about? Between 200,000 and 300,000 of our fellow Philadelphians have been incarcerated. That’s one out of every six people in Philadelphia, and about one in three adults in our city.With little preparation and resources hard to find, successful reentry is a long, uphill battle.

November 2: Hiring from an untapped pool

Reentry: Hiring from an untapped pool | PMN Events

Reentry: Hiring from an untapped pool The Reentry Project is hosting “Reentry: Hiring from an untapped pool,” a panel discussion for the business community about the hiring of people with criminal histories. What makes this event unique is the opportunity for business leaders to talk with each other about this issue.

November 15: The Reentry Blueprint

The Reentry Blueprint: Stories and Solutions from the Formerly Incarcerated

The Reentry Blueprint: Stories and Solutions from the Formerly Incarcerated is a free public event to advance the conversation on reentry in Philadelphia by providing a platform for formerly incarcerated people to present effective models that address the challenges facing people with criminal histories.