New Leash on Life teaches inmates to train unadoptable dogs, giving both a better future

Training For A Better Life – The Philadelphia Citizen

Prison rarely changes one’s life for the better. That much we know to be true. The Bureau of Justice Statistics found that about three quarters of former inmates are re-arrested within five years of their parole.

Data could be key to success for Philadelphia Reentry Coalition

Philadelphia Reentry Coalition wants to solve for the ‘severe lack of data on returning citizens’ – Generocity Philly

That was before we met Aviva Tevah . Tevah is the coalition’s ambitious young director, a subject matter expert with a stacked criminal justice résumé: Nearly two years working at Rikers with a New York-based reentry nonprofit, another two working with reentrants at the NYC Mayor’s Office of Education, a year with New York Reentry Education Network.

What happens to incarcerated people when they are released from prison?

10 things you should know about reentry in Philadelphia – Generocity Philly

Yet, as much of a humanitarian crisis as mass incarceration is in the United States of America, an equally debilitating crisis is the one that follows. What happens to incarcerated people when they are released from prison? ### “Reentry” is the accepted term for the process of reentering society after incarceration, and Philadelphia is home to hundreds of thousands of returning citizens.

Graterford inmate goes from teaching rescue dogs in prison to becoming a dog trainer on the outside

Work can keep Chris Catona out of prison. His past won’t let him keep a job – Generocity Philly

Chris Catona used to spray down sewage for 14 cents an hour on the grounds of SCI Graterford. It was a good gig, his first real one at the state prison, and a big step up from the scraps he could earn doing more general labor inside its walls.

From prison to vice-president, Rob Rosa owes it all to his dogs

A year later, inmates who met Pope Francis are still caught in the justice system – Generocity Philly

(Photo by Max Marin) Correction: Angelo Cameron is Brandan Hargrose’s court-appointed lawyer, not a public defender. Edit 9/28 @ 12:40 p.m. In the summer of 2015, Brandan Hargrose was working in the upholstery shop at Curran-Fromhold Correctional Facility, happy to be using his hands again, to have a job again, a hardscrabble routine for his life behind bars.