Audio: The Reentry Project joins discussion on women and reentry

Reentry Project editor Jean Friedman-Rudovsky participated in the discussion Wednesday when WHYY’s Radio Times addressed women and reentry. Listen now:

From Radio Times:

Experiencing poverty, domestic abuse and sexual violence as a child lead SUSAN BURTON down a long, dark road of emotional despair. Then, after the hit-and-run incident that killed her five-year-old son, Burton turned to drugs as a way to cope with her pain. But, it wasn’t until she entered the California prison system and spent nearly two decades behind bars until she finally received drug treatment and therapy. In this hour, Marty talks with Burton about her memoir, Becoming Ms. Burton which she coauthored with Cari Lynn that tells Burton’s story of prison, recovery and creating A New Way of Life—a nonprofit that supports formerly incarcerated women. MARIE GOTTSCHALK, professor of political science at the University of Pennsylvania, and JEAN FRIEDMAN-RUDOVSKY project editor of The Reentry Project, discuss resources available to women in prison and difficult challenges they face when reentering into society.

 

One: A brownie makes the difference in the neighborhood

Ten things you should know about open hiring

Ten more things you should know about Greyston Bakery and its open hiring process: (Just to review, the Yonkers supplier of brownies to Ben & Jerry’s and Whole Foods skips background checks, skill tests, resumes and references. Applicants put their names on a list and are called when there are openings.

This post is related to yesterday’s report: No skills tests, no background checks, just a life-saving job at a bakery


This piece was produced by The Philadelphia Inquirer, Philadelphia Daily News, Philly.com and WHYY/NewsWorks for The Reentry Project, a citywide collaborative news initiative. It is part of an occasional series — across the city and across platforms — on the challenges facing people returning from prison and what can be done about them.

The Philadelphia InquirerPhilly Daily NewsPhilly Dotcom

Open hiring means getting a job despite having criminal record


No skills tests, no background checks, just a life-saving job at a bakery

When former drug dealer Dion Drew got out of prison, no one would hire him. Then he learned about a bakery that didn’t do background checks, didn’t test skills, didn’t require references. As much as Greyston’s “open hiring” practice helped Drew, it’s also making a difference to the bottom line, says CEO Mike Brady.


This piece was produced by The Philadelphia Inquirer, Philadelphia Daily News, Philly.com and WHYY/NewsWorks for The Reentry Project, a citywide collaborative news initiative. It is part of an occasional series — across the city and across platforms — on the challenges facing people returning from prison and what can be done about them.

The Philadelphia InquirerPhilly Daily NewsPhilly Dotcom