Activists launch efforts to raise community money for bail

Can a Philly community bail fund fix our criminal-justice system?

The Philly Community Bail Fund is an effort that’s part protest against a cash-bail system they say unfairly penalizes the poor, and part stopgap until a more permanent change can be made. – Samantha Melamed, Philadelphia Inquirer and Daily News

Festival raising money to get parents home for the holidays

This festival will help bail Black mothers and fathers out of jail

“The unfairness of waiting in jail because you can’t pay your bail and it’s connected to a lot of the bigger things that we were thinking about this year,” said Andrew Yang, a principal member of Circle Mobilizing Because Black Lives Matter.

Organizers expanding Philadelphia Community Bail Fund

Philly activists raising money to bail poor defendants out of jail

For trying to play peacemaker, Jojuan Powell went to jail. Authorities didn’t believe her claim that she was trying to break up a fight outside her Mantua home last May. So after a teen emerged from the brawl with a broken arm, Powell, 28, found herself behind bars on felony assault charges – wondering how she’d ever afford the $2,501 bail a judge set as her price for freedom.

Jenkins heading for Harrisburg; releases video calling for end to cash bail

Week 7: Malcolm Jenkins Criminal Justice Season – The Philadelphia Citizen

Next week, I’ll be visiting our State Capitol along with other NFL players to talk to lawmakers and policymakers about the state of criminal justice reform, with a special emphasis on lobbying for the Clean Slate Act, which I’ve written about here before. Twice before, I’ve joined my fellow football players on trips to Washington, D.C.

Critics concerned assessment tool could consider proxies for race and socioeconomic status

Can Philly’s new technology predict recidivism without being racist?

A tool to help predict whether someone who’s been arrested will reoffend does not factor in race. But it could consider convictions. So you’ve just been arrested. Welcome to Philadelphia’s criminal justice system.

Criminal justice world divided on risk-assessment tools

How computers are predicting crime – and potentially impacting your future

For about eight years, Philadelphia’s probation and parole department has used a computer algorithm to rate the riskiness of nearly every offender it oversees. But officials there won’t say what factors the tool weighs, raising questions about transparency. The city plans to create a similar risk assessment tool for use in bail decisions.