Hoping to show peers a better way of coping with their situations

After 10 years in and out of jail, how a West Philly father made it back to college

Anthony Hirschbuhl was first arrested when he was 16 for possession of marijuana. He then spent more than a decade in and out of correctional facilities for various parole violations. Now 28, Hirschbuhl is involved with the Goldring Reentry Initiative, a program within the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Social Policy and Practice.

Meet one of the organizers behind Power-Up Reentry

How this Philly hackathon plans to help people after prison

Power-Up Reentry: A Digital Solutions Day will bring together coders, journalists and returning citizens together. Dawn McDougall is looking forward to the upcoming reentry hackathon. Not only is It an important topic but an opportunity, she said, for Philadelphians to look into the issue broadly and develop potential solutions for people returning from prison.

Critics concerned assessment tool could consider proxies for race and socioeconomic status

Can Philly’s new technology predict recidivism without being racist?

A tool to help predict whether someone who’s been arrested will reoffend does not factor in race. But it could consider convictions. So you’ve just been arrested. Welcome to Philadelphia’s criminal justice system.

Dealing often felt more promising than school

Lost in the education system, two West Philly natives on what got them into – and out of – jail

John Glenn and Aaron Kirkland say drug dealing often felt more promising than school Josh Glenn was first introduced to the world of drug dealing when he was 13. When he was working as a bagger at local grocery stores, someone from his West Philadelphia community approached him, asking if he would be interested in making “real money.”

‘What do you need to thrive back in your community?’

After prison, Faith Bartley wants to help other women get a second chance

Still struggling herself to find housing, Bartley wants to ask other women returning from prison, ‘What do you need to thrive back in your community?’ Faith Bartley wants a home to call her own. Not just a rented room, but somewhere that can take her away from the community that she’s known all her life.