This month: A new art collaboration, free expungement clinics, families of incarcerated individuals and more

Parenting from inside prison walls

Barnes Foundation teams with Mural Arts’ re-entry program

Philadelphia Reentry Coalition has finally released cohesive recidivism data

New tool helps juvenile lifers navigate reentry to a dramatically different world

Volunteer lawyers help Philly offenders clear records and move forward

Read it now:
The Reentry Project Monthly: March, 2018

To have this free newsletter delivered via email each month, simply add your address to the form in our sidebar and click the “Subscribe Now” button.

Family stays connected through phone calls and letters

Parenting from inside prison walls

At sunrise on a cold Saturday, while most families were still enjoying their extra time to snooze, Nekia Pressley and her children gathered in her Dodge minivan for their regular trip to Graterford prison. Pressley, 38, lives with three of her children in the Hunting Park section of the city – Yani, 17; Dimeen, 13; and Darwish, 10.

Each year 25,000 return to Philadelphia after incarceration

Philadelphia Reentry Coalition has finally released cohesive recidivism data – Generocity Philly

It’s a new era of accountability for Philadelphia’s criminal justice collective – and for the 25,000 individuals who return to the city from prison and jail every year. On Wednesday, March 14, members of the Philadelphia Reentry Coalition (PRC) gathered at the Office of the District Attorney for its quarterly stakeholder meeting.

Restorative justice collaboration helps formerly incarcerated individuals make connections through art

Barnes Foundation teams with Mural Arts’ re-entry program – Philly

The Barnes Foundation has repurposed its ticketing gatehouse into an art studio for participants in Mural Arts’ Restorative Justice program. – Bethany Ao, Philadelphia Inquirer and Daily News

Expungement clinics being held around city

Volunteer lawyers help Philly offenders clear records and move forward

Nearly one in three Philadelphia residents has a criminal record. Many of these people were never found guilty of a major wrongdoing, but often that doesn’t make a difference. Just having “a record” is enough to make you ineligible for employment, education, housing and public assistance.

Reentry Navigator created to make finding resources easier for former juvenile lifers

New tool helps juvenile lifers navigate reentry to a dramatically different world | Opinion – Philly

The challenge of building new lives on the outside is daunting and in many ways, it is more difficult for former juvenile lifers than for other formerly incarcerated men and women. – Lauren Fine, Joanna Visser Adjoian, Philadelphia Inquirer and Daily News