Animal control officer honored for work he started while in prison

This Germantown native helps Philly dogs get adopted and takes strays off the streets

Animal control officer Steven Morales’ schedule changes constantly. From replying to complaints to responding to calls about stranded animals, he doesn’t have a typical day at Philly’s Animal Care & Control Team. Though it can get hectic at times, the work he does can be rewarding and something he wants to continue to do.

Data could be key to success for Philadelphia Reentry Coalition

Philadelphia Reentry Coalition wants to solve for the ‘severe lack of data on returning citizens’ – Generocity Philly

That was before we met Aviva Tevah . Tevah is the coalition’s ambitious young director, a subject matter expert with a stacked criminal justice résumé: Nearly two years working at Rikers with a New York-based reentry nonprofit, another two working with reentrants at the NYC Mayor’s Office of Education, a year with New York Reentry Education Network.

What happens to incarcerated people when they are released from prison?

10 things you should know about reentry in Philadelphia – Generocity Philly

Yet, as much of a humanitarian crisis as mass incarceration is in the United States of America, an equally debilitating crisis is the one that follows. What happens to incarcerated people when they are released from prison? ### “Reentry” is the accepted term for the process of reentering society after incarceration, and Philadelphia is home to hundreds of thousands of returning citizens.

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Graterford inmate goes from teaching rescue dogs in prison to becoming a dog trainer on the outside

Work can keep Chris Catona out of prison. His past won’t let him keep a job – Generocity Philly

Chris Catona used to spray down sewage for 14 cents an hour on the grounds of SCI Graterford. It was a good gig, his first real one at the state prison, and a big step up from the scraps he could earn doing more general labor inside its walls.

A $10K grant pairs female inmates with shelter dogs for training program

Female inmates help train shelter dogs with $10K grant

It may have been her pronounced underbite that kept Sparky from getting adopted. But now, the mixed-breed rescue is about to become a service dog. New Leash on Life, which pairs adoptable shelter dogs with prison inmates, just received a $10,000 grant earmarked for female prisoners from The Transition Network, a group of professional women, through its fund at The Philadelphia Foundation, the group announced.