Business leaders discuss benefits of hiring formerly incarcerated people


This morning in Philadelphia, The Reentry Project hosted “Reentry: Hiring from an untapped pool,” a panel discussion about hiring formerly incarcerated people.


Panelists seated from left included Donna Allie, PhD, president and CEO of Team Clean, Jeff Brown, chief executive of Brown’s Super Stores Inc., Bob Logue, president of Quaker City Coffee and Beth Tiewater, director of development and programs of Baker Industries.


As representatives of local companies who frequently hire from the reentry pool, they spoke about why they do it, what the challenges are, and why they think other businesses could benefit.


The Philadelphia Media Network organized this gathering, which took place at the Chamber of Commerce for Greater Philadelphia.

Tell us your story

Photos: Prison reform advocate Ismael Nazario shared his experience Saturday at The Reentry Project Story Booth.

Staffers from The Reentry Project, WHYY Newsworks and PhillyCAM recorded the testimony of participants who volunteered to share their journeys through reentry Saturday during a symposium in West Philadelphia.

And we did it again Monday evening at our first community event:

If These Walls Could Talk: Solving Reentry and Recidivism

Stay tuned to this site to learn about future events and story booths. We will share those stories on this site when the recordings are produced.

About Ismael Nazario:

You can learn more about Ismael Nazario by watching his talk at TEDxNewYork: What I learned as a kid in jail

From ted.com:

As a teenager, Ismael Nazario was sent to New York’s Rikers Island jail, where he spent 300 days in solitary confinement — all before he was ever convicted of a crime. Now as a prison reform advocate he works to change the culture of American jails and prisons, where young people are frequently subjected to violence beyond imagination. Nazario tells his chilling story and suggests ways to help, rather than harm, teens in jail.