More prison admissions, far steeper sentences

Generations of Philadelphia families are incarcerated together

Cintron Sr.’s own father wasn’t around when he was a kid in Puerto Rico. He came to Philadelphia at 15 in search of opportunities, and found gang life. “When I fight the leader,” he said, in English learned in prison, “I become the leader of the gang.”

Act of good citizenship sparks fast friendship

A lawyer’s lost bags lead to a juvenile lifer’s redemption

The briefcases lay on the South Philadelphia street, abandoned, one neatly leaning against the other like a couple of downed dominoes. At first, Jeffrey Branch, 53, thought someone got robbed. Nope, he told himself. Not touching those. He took another look.

Employers discuss hiring previously incarcerated people

Advice for firms to hire former inmates: Let a partner help

Bruce Murray hires for a 10-person window rehab business. Bonnie Eckstein is talent acquisition manager for Ikea, which runs 47 U.S. stores. Both want to know more about how to hire people coming from prison. – Jane M. Von Bergen, Philadelphia Inquirer and Daily News

Family hopes new district attorney will take up case for review

A prosecutor meets the juvenile lifer he locked up for 40 years – and apologizes

“You never drove a car. You never fell in love with somebody. You never had any of the things that all of us take for granted. And I want you to know I am responsible for that – because I told the jury what they should do, and they did it.”

Inside-Out Prison Exchange celebrates 20 years

How a Temple professor and a prison inmate started an international movement

The Inside-Out Prison Exchange, which started with Temple University classes held in a Philadelphia county jail, has endured for two decades, expanded to about 150 correctional institutions and taught a total of 30,000 “inside” and “outside” students. – Samantha Melamed, Philadelphia Inquirer and Daily News

Juvenile lifer released, finds himself surrounded by unfamiliar devices

Locked up 40 years for a murder his brother confessed to, Kevin Brinkley returns home, to a changed world

When Kevin Brinkley was locked up four decades ago at the age of 15, he had never heard of such a thing as a mobile phone. On Thursday morning, as he stepped blinking into the daylight outside of the State Correctional Institution-Forest, he was surrounded by the unfamiliar devices.